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Special Health Needs

Epilepsy
Seizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.

Dealing With a Health Condition
If you suffer from a chronic illness, you know it can be anything but fun. But you can become better informed and more involved in your care. Here are tips to help you deal.

Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral palsy is the most common developmental disability in the United States. It affects a person's ability to coordinate body movements.

HIV and AIDS
There is no cure for AIDS, which is why prevention is so important. Get the facts on HIV/AIDS, as well as how it affects the body and is treated, in this article.

Lupus
Lupus is a disease that affects the immune system. Learn how lupus is treated, signs and symptoms, how to support a friend who has it, and more.

Muscular Dystrophy
Muscular dystrophy is a disorder that weakens a person's muscles. Because the condition weakens muscles over time, teens and adults who have the disease can gradually lose the ability to do everyday tasks.

Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that causes the body to produce mucus that's extremely thick and sticky. It mainly affects the lungs and the pancreas, causing serious breathing and digestive problems.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
In polycystic ovary syndrome, the ovaries produce higher than normal amounts of certain hormones, which can interfere with egg development and release. Learn how doctors diagnose and treat PCOS.

Visual Impairment
When one or more parts of the eye or brain that are needed to process images become diseased or damaged, severe or total loss of vision can occur. Read all about visual impairment.

Kidney Disease
Sometimes, the kidneys aren't able to do their job properly. Other than kidney infections, the two most common kidney conditions among teens are nephritis and nephrosis.

Hemophilia
For guys with a rare bleeding disorder called hemophilia, minor cuts and bruises can be a big deal. The good news is that it's a lot easier to control now than in the past, and most guys with hemophilia live pretty normal lives.

Turner Syndrome
Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in every 2,500 females. Read this article to learn more about the condition and how doctors treat Turner syndrome.

Hearing Impairment
Hearing impairment occurs when there's a problem with or damage to one or more parts of the ear. The degree of impairment can vary widely. Find out its causes and what can be done to help correct it.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. Inflammatory bowel disease is an ongoing illness caused by an inflammation of the intestines.

Tourette Syndrome
Tourette syndrome affects the body's brain and nervous system by causing tics - repeated, uncontrollable movements or involuntary vocal sounds.

Celiac Disease
People who have celiac disease, a disorder that makes their bodies react to gluten, can't eat certain kinds of foods. Find out more - including what foods are safe and where to find them.

Coarctation of the Aorta
When someone has coarctation of the aorta, that person's aorta (the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body) is narrowed at some point.

Ventricular Septal Defect
Ventricular septal defect, or VSD, is a heart condition that a few teens can have. Find out what it is, how it happens, and what doctors do to correct it.

Atrial Septal Defect
Atrial septal defect, or ASD, is a heart condition that teens can have. In most cases, ASDs are diagnosed and treated successfully with few or no complications.

Marfan Syndrome
Marfan syndrome affects the body's connective tissue and can cause problems in the eyes, joints, and heart. But teens with Marfan syndrome can live normal lives. Find out how in this article.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor
You're probably used to answering your doctor's questions - not asking your own. But it's your body, so you should be able to ask your doctor questions about anything you'd like. Here are some ideas to get you started.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complicated disease for doctors to diagnose — and even fully understand. Find out more about this often misunderstood condition.

Hearing Impairment: Kristin's Story
You wouldn't know it to meet her, but when Kristin was only 18 months old, her doctors diagnosed her with a hearing impairment. She had to learn to hear in a very different way from her peers - and developed some handy lipreading skills along the way!

Cerebral Palsy: Keith's Story
Keith has cerebral palsy. This is his story about life in high school, dating, sports, and taking chances.

Anxiety: Rachel's Story
Rachel developed an anxiety disorder during her junior and year of high school. Today she's in college and enjoying life. Read her story.

Alopecia: Kayla's Story
Kayla lost her hair, but that didn't stop her from winning beauty pageants. Read how the winner of the Miss Delaware crown relied on confidence and leadership to stand above the crowd.

Dwarfism
A dwarf is a short-statured person whose adult height is 4 feet 10 inches or under. Find out what happens when a person has dwarfism and why some people are born with it.

Sickle Cell Anemia
More than 70,000 Americans have sickle cell anemia, which occurs when someone inherits two abnormal genes that cause red blood cells to change shape. Find out more.

Cancer: DJ's Story (Video)
Leukemia survivor DJ talks about coping with cancer in this video for teens.

Asthma Center
Visit our Asthma Center for information and advice on managing and living with asthma.

Diabetes Center
Our Diabetes Center provides information and advice for teens about treating and living with diabetes.

Cancer Center
Visit our Cancer Center for teens to get information and advice on treating and coping with cancer.

Blood Types
Blood might look the same and do the same job, but tiny cell markers mean one person's body can reject another person's blood. Find out how blood types work in this article for teens.

Asthma: Monica's Story (Video)
Monica, 17 developed asthma when she was 14. In this video, she talks about how she adapted to life with asthma.

Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video)
DJ has type 2 diabetes. In this video, he talks about how he adjusted and what's working when it comes to taking care of himself.

Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video)
Marco, 18, was diagnosed with diabetes 2 years ago. He talks about adjusting to life with diabetes and preparing to go to college.

Transitioning Your Medical Care: Sickle Cell Disease
At a certain point, you'll no longer be able to see your childhood doctor. There are a lot of steps to making a smooth switch to adult health care. Here are some tips for people living with sickle cell disease.

Sickle Cell Disease: Mike's Story (Video)
In this video Mike, 18, talks about living with sickle cell disease, including how he copes with pain episodes and manages his schoolwork.

Sickle Cell Disease: Theresa's Story (Video)
Theresa, 16, talks about managing her sickle cell when she's feeling well as a way to ward off pain crises and other problems.

Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Steven's Story (Video)
Steven was diagnosed with SMA when he was 3. Here's a look at his life today and why he says, "When someone tells you you can't do something, don't be afraid to try something new."

Taking Charge of Your Medical Care
Like learning to drive, figuring out health care is part of becoming an independent adult. Here are tips for teens on what that involves, and how to choose your own doctor.

Dwarfism: Emily's Story (Video)
Emily was adopted from Russia, where she was born with a type of dwarfism. In this video, she talks about her life philosophy and how she overcame the many hurdles she faced.