Neonatology

Connecticut Children’s Medical Center’s highly skilled neonatology staff provides exceptional care to premature or critically ill newborns in two state-of-the-art neonatal intensive care units (NICU) located at Hartford Hospital (Level 4) and the University of Connecticut Health Center (Level 3).

Connecticut Children’s board certified physicians, neonatal advanced practitioners and NICU nurses use advanced technologies to care for the sickest newborns with the most complex conditions. Our highly trained neonatologists treat babies born prematurely, with breathing problems, infections, surgical needs or other potentially life-threatening conditions.

Nearly 1,000 newborns are admitted into Connecticut Children’s NICUs from hospitals across the region each year. Our comprehensive family-centered care includes:

  • Prenatal consultations, as requested by our partners in maternal-fetal medicine, obstetrics and pediatrics from area hospitals
  • Transport of critically ill newborns to our neonatal facilities for higher-level care
  • 24/7 intensive medical, surgical and nursing care
  • 24/7 attendance by specialists in all areas of newborn medicine and radiology
  • 24/7 accessibility for phone consultations with pediatric health care providers caring for newborns
  • Physician and advanced practitioner attendance at high-risk births

Connecticut Children’s neonatologists work closely with specialists in obstetrics, maternal-fetal medicine, pediatric surgery, pediatric cardiology, pediatric neurology, genetics, and other medical and surgical specialties to ensure the best care for babies and their families.

When babies leave the NICU after treatment, Connecticut Children’s provides nutrition and lactation education to help you care for your baby at home. In addition, neonatal patients are supported by our Transitional Medical Care Program which helps pediatricians provide the unique care these newborns need. Babies who are high-risk for neurological and developmental conditions receive specialized care for up to two years in the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow-up Program.