Connecticut Children's Launches Learning Collaborative to Promote Innovative Community Child Health Model

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 15, 2017

MEDIA CONTACT(S): Monica Buchanan, Director of Corporate Communications
                                   (860) 837-5701; mbuchanan@connecticutchildrens.org

                                   Debra Dudack, Communications Specialist
                                   (860) 837-6225; ddudack@connecticutchildrens.org

HARTFORD, Conn. – Connecticut Children’s Medical Center is a national leader in the field of community child health and is now launching a new learning collaborative to share its community child health experiences, lessons learned, and tools with select children’s hospitals around the country.

With a $75,000 grant from the Hearst Foundations, our Connecticut Children’s Office for Community Child Health (the Office) will lead the learning collaborative in conjunction with Boston-based consultant Root Cause. The Children’s Hospital Association (CHA) will be an active participant in the collaborative and is interested in spreading lessons from the collaborative to its broader membership. The collaborative holds its first meeting on Monday, February 13 at Connecticut Children’s Office for Community Child Health in East Hartford.

The collaborative will foster shared learning among peer institutions on how children’s hospitals can enhance their status as critical community resources by promoting the optimal healthy development of all children, strengthening families, and building partnerships with community-based programs that touch all sectors impacting children. Participants will attend in-person and virtual sessions that will assist them in developing or refining their community child health vision and mission; developing an action plan for engaging community programs and partners; adopting tools and strategies to build and sustain hospital-based community child health infrastructure; designing an approach to identify and support promising innovations; and developing a measurement framework to demonstrate the impact of their community child health efforts.

“We are excited by the opportunity to provide support and technical assistance to those institutions seeking to strengthen their community status and impact,” said Paul H. Dworkin, MD, executive vice president for community child health at Connecticut Children’s. “Indeed, there is no organization better suited than children’s hospitals to embrace a mission of strengthening families to promote the optimal healthy development of all children.”

Participants in the learning collaborative include:

  • Children’s Health System of Texas/Children’s Medical Center Dallas
  • Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin
  • Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
  • Greenville Health System Children’s Hospital
  • HCA (Hospital Corporation of America) Healthcare
  • Lehigh Valley Children’s Hospital
  • UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland—Center for Community Health and Engagement
  • Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital

“The Hearst Foundations believe that this Learning Collaborative is an effective model for creating sustainable community child health infrastructures where program and data evaluation systems are strategically coordinated to deliver more timely, germane and accessible solutions to the complex developmental challenges facing vulnerable children,” said Ligia Cravo, senior program officer for the Hearst Foundations.

The first phase of the learning collaborative will take place over a one-year period. Institutions will then have the option of continuing with the collaborative for a second year, where they will obtain further assistance in implementing their newly developed community child health plans.

About Connecticut Children’s Medical Center
Connecticut Children’s Medical Center is the only hospital in Connecticut dedicated exclusively to the care of children. Connecticut Children’s is a nationally recognized not-for-profit with a medical staff of more than 1,000 providing comprehensive, world-class health care in more than 30 pediatric specialties and subspecialties. Connecticut Children’s Medical Center is the primary pediatric teaching hospital for the UConn School of Medicine and Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University as well as a research partner of Jackson Laboratory. Connecticut Children’s Office for Community Child Health is a national leader in community-based prevention and wellness programs.

To learn more about Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, please visit connecticutchildrens.org.

About the Connecticut Children’s Office for Community Child Health
Connecticut Children’s Office for Community Child Health serves as a coordinating entity for the Medical Center’s community-oriented programs and as an incubator for innovative models that strengthen the community child health system and enhance children’s optimal healthy development. The Office oversees fifteen community-oriented programs, including the Help Me Grow® (HMG) National Center and Easy Breathing©. Both HMG, which promotes early detection and connection to services for children at risk for developmental and behavioral problems through a centralized telephone access point, and Easy Breathing©, a community-based asthma management program, were piloted in Hartford before being scaled up and adopted in many states. The Office for Community Child Health extends the impact of such innovative programs regionally and nationally through the creation of replicable, evidence-informed models of care. For more information on the Office for Community Child Health, visit www.connecticutchildrens.org/community-child-health.

About the Hearst Foundations
The Hearst Foundations are national philanthropic resources for organizations and institutions working in the fields of Education, Health, Culture and Social Service. Our goal is to ensure that people of all backgrounds have the opportunity to build healthy, productive and inspiring lives. The charitable goals of the Foundations reflect the philanthropic interests of William Randolph Hearst. Read more about the Hearst Foundations.