Interested in bringing Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships to your high school? Contact Program Coordinator Amneris Torres, LCSW at:

Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships

kids at partyBuilding a Culture of Healthy Relationships is a high school-based program that teaches and promotes healthy pro-social interactions between peers.

In Connecticut, 7.8% of high school students reported on the Connecticut School Health Survey (CSHS) that they have been physically forced to have sexual intercourse. Connecticut General Statute Sec. 17a-101q requires that sexual abuse and assault education be implemented in each local and regional school district. BCHR is a program that can serve to fulfill this mandate.

Curriculum Overview

This 7-session curriculum addresses topics that include violence against women, co-occurring forms of abuse, healthy vs. unhealthy relationships and how to be an ally against violence. The Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships curriculum aims to promote a change in beliefs regarding healthy relationships through:

  • Group discussions
  • Media
  • Interactive activities
  • Reflective journaling

Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships was developed to support teens in working to build a culture that is supportive of healthy behaviors and non-violence. A primary objective of the curriculum is to provide students with a foundation that fosters mutual respect and understanding with peers.

Educational Videos

Below is a glimpse of the educational videos that are part of BCHR. These three scenarios were adapted from The MVP Playbook for High School Males by Jackson Katz. Katz is known for being a leader in the movement of men working towards promoting gender equality and prevent gender violence.

The purpose of these scenarios is to create space for a discussion by youth on how to be an ally and how they can intervene safely.

Scene 1 – Parking Lot:

Discussion question:

What should I do?

Possible answers:

  • Don’t say anything. It’s just harmless fun and speaking up would do more harm than good.
  • Try to change the subject in order to distract my friends.
  • Don’t say anything then, but later, tell my friend that I don’t think we could be harassing women like that.
  • Talk to a female friend about the situation later and find out what she thinks I could have done.
  • Directly address my friend.

Scene 2 – Party:

Discussion questions:

What should I do?

Possible answers:

  • Do nothing. It’s really none of my business
  • Try to get my friend to leave the girl alone.
  • Find some of her friends so they can get her home safety.
  • Approach the woman to see if she needs help.
  • Recruit some friends to approach the male.

Scene 3 – Hallway:

Discussion questions:

What should I do?

Possible answers:

  • Nothing. It’s none of my business.
  • Attempt to distract the couple, in order to defuse the situation.
  • Shout something at the couple like, “Hey what are you doing? Leave her alone” with hopes they will stop.
  • Do nothing at the moment, approach the male later and talk to him about what happened.
  • Once the male is going, check on the girl to make sure she is okay.
  • Talking to an adult, like a guidance counselor, school social worker, a teacher or school nurse and ask them advice on what to do.

Citation: www.jacksonkatz.com

Bring Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships to your School

The curriculum is currently being implemented in four Connecticut high schools. If you are interested in learning more about how to bring Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships to your high school, please contact Program Coordinator Amneris Torres, LCSW at 860.837.5308.

Building a Culture of Healthy Relationship is made possible by The Allstate Foundation.

Back To Top
Searching Animation
Searching