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  • How to Prepare a Child With Autism Spectrum Disorder for a Visit to Connecticut Children’s By Jennifer Twachtman-Bassett, M.S. CCC-SLP, CCRP  A hospital visit can be scary for a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), even if the visit is a quick doctor’s appointment. Since a hospital visit is almost never routine, it disrupts the child’s entire day, not just for the time that they spend in their visit. Plus, […]
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  • Become a Connecticut Children’s Champion Become a Connecticut Children’s Champion Sign up to become a Connecticut Children’s Champion and become part of our advocacy network: Subscribe * indicates required Email Address * First Name * Last Name Address Address Line 2 City State/Province/Region Postal / Zip Code Country USAAaland IslandsAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntigua And BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAru[...]
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  • Special Considerations for Children and Adolescents Following a Vegetarian or Vegan Diet By Donna Barnett, MA, RDN, CD Plants give us lots of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and protective phytochemicals. Plant based diets can reduce your risk of obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and some cancers. There are several different kinds of plant based diets. For example, someone who is vegan avoids red meat, […]
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  • 6 Exercises That Can Help Prevent Knee Injuries Nearly half of all sports injuries are knee injuries. They can sideline you for weeks or months at a time. The good news? Research shows a combination of strength, balance, and plyometric exercises can reduce the risk of knee injuries. Physical therapists from Connecticut Children’s identified six such exercises to try. Sophia, one of our patients, demonstrates […]
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  • Cecelia’s Story By Kara Satalino, Cecelia’s mom My daughter, Cecelia, looks like any normal 3-year-old, and she is definitely the sassiest little girl I’ve ever met. She’s wild and smart. She loves to run and play sports with her three older brothers, especially soccer. At the boys’ games, we have to play with her on the sidelines […]
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  • Amelia’s Story By Lizzie Drake, Amelia’s mom My daughter Amelia is 3 years old. She has curly blonde hair and blue eyes. She’s feisty and spunky. She’s always happy, loves life, and loves to play and sing songs. She loves to read and be outside, and she loves going to preschool. Amelia also has cystic fibrosis (CF), […]
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  • Tips for Staying Safe this Halloween By Kevin Borrup, DrPH, JD, MPA is the Associate Director of Connecticut Children’s Injury Prevention Center When you drive home on October 31st, drive more slowly than usual, watch out for kids and adults who may be out and about in places you normally would not expect them to be. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, children […]
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  • Does Your Child Need a Sleep Study? Here’s What You Need to Know Do you ever wonder if your child might benefit from a sleep study? Or, has your child already been scheduled for one? You might wonder what is involved and how to make your child more comfortable during this procedure. You might also wonder whether your child will be able to tolerate the necessary sensations for […]
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  • Eighth Grader Gets Kneecap Stability and his Life Back with Groundbreaking Procedure at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center Andrew DiMauro is a typical eighth-grade boy who lives for sports and having fun with his friends. But when a knee malformation he was born left him on the sidelines one too many times, he and his family turned to an expert at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. Dr. Lee Pace, an orthopedic surgeon with the […]
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  • Meet the 2018 CT Election Candidates Meet the Candidates Who Are Running in the 2018 Election We asked the candidates to answer a few questions about their perspectives on children’s health and how they would address key issues if they were to be elected. Candidates were asked to provide an overview about themselves in 50 words or less, and to answer […]
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  • Connecticut Children’s Medical Center Top Pick Among Moms as a 2019 Women’s Choice Award® Best Children’s Hospital October 5, 2018 Media Contacts: Kathi Waldhof Women’s Choice Award® Healthcare Client Services 954-922-0846 Monica Buchanan Connecticut Children’s Medical Center Director of Communications 352-219-0860 Hartford, CT – Connecticut Children’s Medical Center has been named as a Best Children’s Hospital by the Women’s Choice Award®, America’s trusted referral source for the best in healthcare. Add[...]
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  • What You Need to Know About Sports-Related Concussions Concussions are one of the top sports-related injuries, and require prompt diagnosis and treatment. We sat down with David Wang, MD, MS, division head of Connecticut Children’s Sports Medicine division, to talk about concussion prevention, how to recognize the signs and symptoms, and what happens if your young athlete sustains a concussion. Are there any […]
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  • Your Back to School Guide It’s Back to School time! As you prepare to send your child off, check out our Back to School guide for ideas from Connecticut Children’s pediatric experts on what to pack for lunch, how to keep your children safe on the bus, tips for waking up on time, and more! Preparing for the First Day […]
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  • 30 ways we specialize in your child’s health When you need pediatric subspecialty care, why look any further than your Connecticut Children’s location close to home? Ranked by U.S. News & World Report as a 2018-2019 Best Children’s Hospital, Connecticut Children’s has made it easier than ever to receive the best care for your child. A medical staff of more than 1,000 provides […]
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  • Connecticut Children’s Aerodigestive Program’s Team Approach a Breath of Fresh Air for Pediatric Patients For Amanda and Christopher Renz, pulmonology issues have been a long-standing family affair—along with related medical problems. “Our journey in the medical world began shortly after the birth of our first daughter, Molly, in 2005,” said Molly’s mother, Amanda Renz. “By the time she reached her first birthday, she had suffered through nearly a dozen […]
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  • #DadDocs – Meet Dr. Nicholas Bennett With father’s Day fast approaching we’re introducing you to a few of our many doctors who do double-duty as Dads! Meet Dr. Nicholas Bennett, division head of Connecticut Children’s Division of Infectious Diseases & Immunology! How many children do you have and how old are they? I have two kids – a young man aged […]
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  • Thinking About Your Child’s Next School Year—It’s not too Early! Although signs of spring are just beginning to show, it is not too early to start thinking about ways to help your child make the most of the move to a new school year this fall. During the next months, schools hold planning meetings for the transition to the next academic year, which often present […]
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  • Connecticut Children’s and St. Vincent’s Medical Center Team up to Provide Enhanced NICU Care Close to Home April 5, 2018 Media Contacts: Monica Buchanan, Director of Corporate Communications 860.837.5701 Hartford & Bridgeport, CT – Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and St. Vincent’s Medical Center announced today a new community alliance that will enhance neonatal care for families locally. Under the agreement, Connecticut Children’s neonatologists will provide 24/7 physician coverage for the [...]
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  • Preventing Childhood Poisonings In recognition of National Poison Prevention Week, Margaret Burke, Pharm.D., CSPI shares some facts about accidental poisonings in children and what to do if you think your child (or you) has been exposed to a poison.  What to Do If You Think a Child Is Exposed to a Poison If the child appears to be […]
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  • Connecticut Children’s CEO Shares Perspective on Gun Control By Jim Shmerling, DHA, FACHE, President and CEO, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center Ever since the Florida school shootings last week I have been asked several times, “What is the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center’s position on gun control?” I have debated posting my own personal position, but worry that my opinion may not reflect accurately that […]
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  • What it Means to Dance for 18 Hours By Caroline Weed, HuskyTHON The first time I participated in HuskyTHON as a freshman at UConn, I was nervous. I didn’t really understand what all the hype was about, but I figured if everyone is doing it and chooses to do it every year, it must be fun. When the opening ceremonies began, it started […]
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  • What to Expect: Sedation What to Expect: Sedation Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Welcome! What to expect during my special visit. I am going to Connecticut Children’s Medical Center for a special test. I have to go to Sedation so that I can be asleep for […]
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  • Celebrating National Health IT Week In honor of National Health IT Week, we sat down with a few colleagues from Connecticut Children’s Information Technology team to discuss what’s next for healthcare technology and information security. John Shepard, Chief Information Security Officer John sets the strategic security vision for Connecticut Children’s, including defining the security standards that protect patient information a[...]
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  • Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships Building a Culture of Healthy Relationships is a high school-based program that teaches and promotes healthy pro-social interactions between peers. In Connecticut, 7.8% of high school students reported on the Connecticut School Health Survey (CSHS) that they have been physically forced to have sexual intercourse. Connecticut General Statute Sec. […][...]
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  • Sickle Cell Awareness: Robert’s Story Written by Robert Ffrench, grateful patient My name is Robert K. Ffrench and I am a graduating patient of Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. I was originally sent to this medical facility when I had a stroke at the age of 8 years old due to my sickle cell disease, after another hospital (which won’t be […]
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  • What to Expect: Neurology What to Expect: A Neurology Appointment Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Welcome! Here we go… to Neurology I am going to a doctor’s appointment today in Neurology at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. Time to check in at the window.    We will […]
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  • What to Expect: EEG What to Expect: EEG Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Welcome! Here we go for an EEG.   I am going to have an EEG today at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. I am having an EEG to check my brain.   First we […]
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  • What to Expect: Hearing Test – Farmington What to Expect: Hearing Test – Farmington Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Here we go… for a hearing test! In a regular hearing test, your child will be asked to raise his/her hand in response to a sound. The sounds will get […]
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  • What to Expect: Hearing Test – Glastonbury What to Expect: Hearing Test – Glastonbury Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Here we go… for a hearing test! In a regular hearing test, your child will be asked to raise his/her hand in response to a sound. The sound will get […]
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  • What to Expect: Hearing Test – Hartford What to Expect: Hearing Test – Hartford Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Here we go… for a hearing test! In a regular hearing test, your child will be asked to raise his/her hand in response to a sound. The sound will get […]
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  • What to Expect: Play Hearing Test – Hartford What to Expect: Play Hearing Test – Hartford Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Here we go… for a play hearing test! This picture story is for young children or older children who might have difficulty learning to raise their hand when they […]
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  • What to Expect: Play Hearing Test – Glastonbury What to Expect: Play Hearing Test – Glastonbury Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Here we go… for a play hearing test! This picture story is for young children or older children who might have difficulty learning to raise their hand when they […]
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  • What to Expect: Play Hearing Test – Farmington What to Expect: Play Hearing Test – Farmington Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Here we go… for a play hearing test! This picture story is for young children or older children who might have difficulty learning to raise their hand when they […]
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  • What to Expect: Blood Lab What to Expect: Getting Blood Drawn Download PDF version For tips on how to use this picture story, please review our picture story instructions. Welcome! Here we go… to get my blood drawn! I am going to the laboratory at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center.    We will wait in the waiting room. I can color […]
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  • Our Miracle: Fiona’s Story Written by grateful mom, Christina B. Meet Fiona Jayne, our little fighter, our miracle baby. We had spent a total of twenty-one long days at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. At only five days old, Fiona became unresponsive when it came time to nurse on a Sunday evening. She had what was considered to be an […]
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  • Craniofacial Awareness Month: Camden’s Story In honor of National Cleft & Craniofacial Awareness & Prevention Month, grateful mother Kristen E. shares her son Camden’s incredible journey living with a bilateral cleft palate and the care he received at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. October 22, 2015 was a day that changed my life. It was the day our son Camden was […]
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  • A Picture Worth More Than a Thousand Words Written by Kelly’s mom, Carolyn  If a picture is worth a thousand words, the ransom for this treasured, priceless photograph would be the Library of Congress. It just happened to be my birthday in November of 2012 when Connecticut Children’s arranged for a Flashes of Hope photographer to capture the precious image of Kelly (who […]
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  • What Should I Do If My Child Wakes Up Too Early? You have a great bedtime routine and your little cherub sleeps well all night, but suddenly your child is waking up at 4am every day! What to do? Try some of the options below. Improve Your Child’s Bedroom Environment Does your child’s room get bright too early? Try blinds, blackout or dark curtains, or even […]
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  • Neonatology For Families For Families The birth of a baby is a joyous time and should be celebrated. However, Connecticut Children’s neonatal specialists understand that having your baby admitted to the NICU may be scary or stressful. We are here to help and are dedicated to providing the very best care for you and your newborn. When a […]
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  • Urology Minimally Invasive Surgery Minimally Invasive Surgery Connecticut Children’s Medical Center uses endoscopy, laparoscopic surgery, and state-of-the-art robotic surgery to treat a range of common and complex urologic conditions affecting children. Minimally invasive surgical techniques and technology allow many procedures to be performed with patients experiencing less pain, smaller scars and a faster recovery time. Conn[...]
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  • Key Measures Key Measures Connecticut Children’s Medical Center is dedicated to providing the highest quality care in the safest manner to our pediatric patients. We collaborate with healthcare professionals across the hospital on many quality and improvement projects that are leading to better outcomes for our patients and supporting our efforts in making Connecticut’s children the healthiest […]
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  • Life Experiences Shape Surgeon’s Desire to Care for Children This article was first published in the Hartford Business Journal. Dr. Christine Finck, Surgeon-in-Chief at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and associate professor and principal investigator at UConn Health, was recently named as one of nine Health Care Heroes in Greater Hartford. The title recognizes individuals working in health care who “share a common passion for […]
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  • 3 Quick Facts about Childhood Insomnia Connecticut Children’s Sleep Center works with many families each year to improve their child’s insomnia. Insomnia refers to trouble falling asleep or trouble staying asleep. Here are three quick facts about childhood insomnia that may help improve your child’s ability to fall and stay asleep. 1.) Not every child with insomnia requires a sleep study […]
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  • Terms & Conditions Terms & Conditions Please read these Terms & Conditions carefully before using the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center website (the “Site”). Connecticut Children’s Medical Center provides this Site to you subject to the following Terms & Conditions and Privacy Statement. If you use this Site, you agree to abide by these terms. Connecticut Children’s Medical Center […][...]
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  • Quality Results Quality Results Connecticut Children’s Medical Center is dedicated to providing the highest quality care in the safest manner to our pediatric patients. We collaborate with healthcare professionals across the hospital on a many quality and improvement projects that are leading to better outcomes for our patients and supporting our efforts in making Connecticut’s Children the […]
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  • Terms & Conditions Please read these Terms & Conditions carefully before using the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center website (the “Site”). Connecticut Children’s Medical Center provides this Site to you subject to the following Terms & Conditions and Privacy Statement. If you use this Site, you agree to abide by these terms. Connecticut Children’s Medical Center reserves the right […]
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  • Sugar! Tasty Trouble? September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and provides an opportunity for learning about ways to prevent and address this serious health concern. Pat Esposito, Clinical Nutrition Manager at Connecticut Children’s shares expert advice and answers your questions on sugar. Guidelines for healthy eating are always changing….so what is a parent to do? The latest update from […][...]
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  • Frequently Asked Questions of a Pediatric Occupational Therapist In honor of Occupational Therapy Month, we sat down with Allison Fullam, Occupational Therapist at Connecticut Children’s to learn all about this very important medical profession and how it helps both adults AND children. What is an Occupational Therapist (OT)? An Occupational Therapist works with people who have disabilities, deficits or injuries. Occupational Therapists help […]
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  • #CTChildrensTurns20: Scott Organek In anticipation of Connecticut Children’s 20th Anniversary on  April 2, Scott Organek, Director of Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals at Connecticut Children’s shares his experience since joining the organization on January 15, 1996! In the early 1990’s a young family friend was hit by a car while riding his bike home from school. During his recovery I […]
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  • Five Questions with Kelly Foy, MS, CCLS In honor of Child Life Month, Connecticut Children’s Child Life Specialist, Kelly Foy answers a few questions about the importance of Child Life and why she loves her job! What is a Child Life Specialist? A child life specialist helps patients and families understand the experience of being in the hospital. A four year old’s comprehension is […]
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  • Blood Donations are Key to Daniela’s Success Daniela Ciriello’s start in this world wasn’t an easy one. Daniela lost her twin sister in the womb and had a tough start in life, suffering from what her parents first thought was colic and abdominal problems. Little did they know things would only get worse for their little girl before they got better. “I […]
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  • Helping Hands in Haiti Dr. Brendan Campbell, Medical Director of Pediatric Trauma at Connecticut Children’s reflects on his weeklong visit to Haiti; where he, retired pediatric surgeon, Dr. Donald Hight and pediatric anesthesiologist, Richard Kuntz, provided surgical care to patients of all ages at the Hopital Sacre Coeur in Milot. We learned a lot over the 7 days we […]
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  • After the Shock . . . Breast Cancer Battle Begins with Courage, Hope and Support By Sharon Napolitano October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month . . .The American Cancer Society estimates that about 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women in the United States in 2015. Sharon Napolitano, a Connecticut Children’s employee, is one of those women. As a new breast cancer survivor, Sharon shares […]
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  • Child Life Volunteer a True Mentor at the Medical Center On Thursday, April 16 Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, in celebration of National Volunteer Week, will honor 385 volunteers with a special recognition reception in the One World Café. Among those in attendance, will be one volunteer in particular, whose dedication and generosity has greatly impacted not only Connecticut Children’s but the entire Hartford community. Jill […]
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  • Gratitude for Connecticut Children’s Medical Center By Sarah Bernhardson, Mom and Blogger for Connecticut Working Moms, ctworkingmoms.com Almost three weeks ago, I arrived home from work to a happy, active three year old who was excitedly planning what kind of cookies we’d bake for our family movie night that evening. Literally one hour later, my poor little guy was on the […]
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  • My Son’s Day At The O.R. By Robin Towle-Fecso It is hard to deal with the words “your son isn’t thriving” as a mom. The pediatrician said this after she glanced at Nathanael’s growth chart during a wellness visit, years ago. The growth chart and I, at this point, hadn’t been really getting along. Every time the doctor’s clipboard came out […]
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  • Ebola: What You Need to Know Ebola seems to be all that anyone is talking about right now.  Below is a brochure you can print from your home computer with some of the most frequently asked questions we’ve received from patients and parents at Connecticut Children’s.  Knowledge is power.
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  • The dreaded “E” words: One parent’s questions answered If I suspect that my child is sick and I take her to the hospital, how can I ensure that healthcare workers will test her right away for either of the viruses (i.e. how do I ensure that insurance/hospital protocols, or the lack thereof, do not interfere with immediate testing and treatment)? Dr. Nick Bennett, […]
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  • Living With Sickle Cell Disease Written by Brandon P., patient at Connecticut Children’s My name is Brandon and I am a 19 year old young man who has been living with sickle cell disease my entire life. I was born with this disease on January 7, 1995. Currently, I am a sophomore at the University of Connecticut, where I am […]
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  • Los riñones y las vías urinarias

    Nuestros cuerpos producen varios tipos de productos de deshecho, como el sudor, el dióxido de carbono, las heces (cacas o deposiciones) y la orina (pis o pipí). Estos productos de deshecho salen del organismo de distintas formas. El sudor se elimina a través de los poros de la piel. El vapor de agua y el dióxido de carbono se exhalan desde los pulmones. Y la parte no digerida de los alimentos se transforma en heces dentro de los intestinos y se excreta en forma sólida a través de las deposiciones.

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  • Tus riñones

    Todo el mundo sabe que algunos órganos del cuerpo humano son necesarios para la supervivencia: necesitas el cerebro, el corazón, los pulmones, los riñones…

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  • Los riñones y las vías urinarias

    Nuestros cuerpos producen distintos tipos de productos de deshecho, como el sudor, el dióxido de carbono, las heces (también conocidas como deposiciones o cacas) y la orina (o pipí).

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  • Ultrasonido: renal (riñones, uréteres, vejiga)

    Los médicos solicitan ultrasonidos renales cuando están preocupados por algunos tipos de problemas renales o de la vejiga.

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  • A to Z: Mononeuritis Multiplex

    Learn about complications of neurologic disorders and conditions that can affect the peripheral nerves.

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  • Piedras en los riñones

    Aunque se presentan más a menudo en adultos, los cálculos renales son bastante comunes en niños.

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  • Coping With Colds

    Most teens get between two and four colds each year. Read this article for the facts on colds and ways to feel better when you catch one.

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  • Going to College

    The first year of college is filled with new challenges and opportunities. Read our article to beef up on your college coping skills.

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  • Food Safety

    Learn why food safety is important and how you can avoid the spread of bacteria when you are buying, preparing, and storing food.

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  • Talking to the Pharmacist

    If your child is sick, you’ll probably have many questions to ask your doctor. But have you made a list of questions and concerns to share with your pharmacist?

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  • Birth Control Pill

    Before you consider having sex, you need to know how to protect yourself. Read this article to learn what birth control pills are, how well they work, and more.

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  • Withdrawal

    Before you consider having sex, you need to know how to protect yourself. Learn about withdrawal – and whether it’s effective at preventing pregnancy and STDs.

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  • Living With Lupus

    Lupus is known as an autoimmune disease in which a person’s immune system mistakenly works against the body’s own tissues.

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  • Hepatitis

    Hepatitis is most commonly caused by one of three viruses. In its early stages, hepatitis may cause flu-like symptoms.

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  • What’s Spit?

    Saliva, also known as spit, is a clear liquid that’s made in your mouth 24 hours a day, every day. If you want to know more about spit and what it’s made of, check out this article for kids.

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  • Sun Safety

    By teaching kids how to enjoy fun in the sun safely, parents can reduce their risk for developing skin cancer.

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  • Heart Murmurs and Your Child

    Heart murmurs are very common, and most are no cause for concern and won’t affect a child’s health.

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  • Communication and Your Newborn

    From birth, your newborn has been communicating with you. Crying may seem like a foreign language, but soon you’ll know what your baby needs – a diaper change, a feeding, or your touch.

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  • Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

    Immunizations have protected millions of children from potentially deadly diseases. Learn about immunizations and find out exactly what they do – and what they don’t.

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  • Fifth Disease

    Especially common in kids between the ages of 5 and 15, fifth disease is a viral illness that produces a distinctive red rash on the face, body, arms, and legs.

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  • Financial Management During Crisis

    Although the emotional price of raising a seriously ill child can be devastating, it’s only part of the picture. Even during this difficult time, you have to consider the financial implications.

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  • Genital Herpes

    You’ve probably heard lots of discouraging news about sexually transmitted diseases. The good news is that STDs can be prevented. Read about how to protect yourself.

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  • Autism

    Autism affects a child’s communication and social skills, behaviors, and ability to learn. There’s no cure, but early intervention and treatment can help kids improve skills and achieve their best potential.

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  • Circumcision

    You have an important decision to make before you take your newborn son home: whether to circumcise him. Before deciding, talk to your doctor and consider the issues.

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  • Autism

    Autism is a developmental disorder that affects the brain and can make communicating and interacting with other people difficult. Find out more.

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  • Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Making a decision to breastfeed or formula feed your baby is a personal one. There are some points to consider to help you decide which option is best for you and your baby.

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  • Compulsive Exercise

    Even though exercise has many positive benefits, too much can be harmful. Teens who exercise compulsively are at risk for both physical and psychological problems.

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  • I Think My Friend May Have an Eating Disorder. What Should I Do?

    Sometimes, normal body-image concerns cross the line and become eating disorders. Here’s how to help if your friend might have a problem.

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  • Pica

    Some young kids have the eating disorder pica, which is characterized by cravings to eat nonfood items.

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  • Male Reproductive System

    Understanding the male reproductive system, what it does, and problems that can affect it can help you better understand your son’s reproductive health.

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  • Brain and Nervous System

    The brain controls everything we do, and is often likened to the central computer within a vast, complicated communication network, working at lightning speed.

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  • Foster Families

    Some kids live with foster families, who provide a safe place for kids to be cared for. Let’s find out more.

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  • Heart Murmurs

    Everyone’s heart makes sounds, but some people have hearts that make more noise than others. Usually, however, these heart murmurs don’t mean anything is wrong. Find out more about these mysterious murmurs.

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  • The Woes of Whooping Cough

    Kids who have whooping cough make a “whoop” sound when they cough. Find out more in this article for kids.

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  • 10 Things That Might Surprise You About Being Pregnant

    Despite all the books, websites, and pamphlets devoted to the topic of pregnancy, this 9-month period can take any expectant mom by surprise.

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  • Sports Supplements

    Sports supplements are products used to enhance athletic performance. Lots of people who want to improve their performance have questions about how supplements work and whether they’re safe.

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  • Ectopic Pregnancy

    In an ectopic pregnancy, a fertilized egg has implanted outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tubes. If undiagnosed, as the pregnancy grows, it can burst the organ that contains it and endanger the mother’s life.

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  • Eek! It’s Eczema!

    Everybody has dry skin once in a while, but eczema is more than just that. If your skin is dry, itchy, red, sore, and scaly, you may have eczema. Learn more about this uncomfortable condition and what you can to do stop itching!

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  • Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Where you choose to give birth is an important decision. Is a hospital or a birth center right for you? Knowing the facts can help you make your decision.

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  • Birth Defects

    Birth defects are relatively common. Some are minor and cause no problems; others cause major disabilities. Learn about the different types of birth defects, and how to help prevent them.

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  • How Can I Quit Smoking?

    Nearly 1 in 5 deaths in the United States is related to tobacco. Are you ready to kick the habit?

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  • Thyroid Disease Definitions

    Check out these definitions to help you understand the thyroid gland and thyroid disease.

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  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Carpal tunnel syndrome can make your hands feel numb and tingly. Find out more in this article for kids.

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  • When Your Baby Has a Birth Defect

    If your child has a birth defect, you don’t have to go it alone – many people and resources are available to help you.

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  • Week 40

    A baby born at 40 weeks weighs, on average, 7 pounds, 4 ounces and measures about 20 inches from head to toe.

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  • Seeing Your Way Through Strabismus

    Strabismus is when someone’s eyes don’t look straight ahead. It might look as if the person has one crossed eye. Find out more in this article for kids.

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  • Word! Saliva

    Slimy! Slippery! Saliva is none other than spit, the clear liquid in your mouth that’s made of water and other chemicals.

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  • Birth Control Methods: How Well Do They Work?

    Some birth control methods work better than others. This chart compares how well different birth control methods work.

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  • Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    Kids who have cystic fibrosis need to eat extra calories to stay healthy. Find out why in this article for kids.

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  • Backpack Basics

    Backpacks help you to stay organized. They’re also better for carrying school supplies than messenger or other shoulder bags. But can they cause health problems?

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  • How Can I Help My Child Cooperate While Using the Nebulizer?

    Nebulizers are often used with young children because they require little effort on the child’s part. But kids do need to stay in one place and cooperate. If you have a young child, you know how challenging that can be.

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  • Metabolism

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  • Phobias

    A phobia is strong fear of something. Find out more in this article for kids.

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  • Boys and Puberty

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  • Kids Talk About: Valentine’s Day (K-Z)

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  • Moving to Middle School

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  • Mononucleosis

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  • Motivating Preschoolers to Be Active

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  • Brain and Nervous System

    If the brain is a central computer that controls all the functions of the body, then the nervous system is like a network that relays messages back and forth to different parts of the body. Find out how they work in this Body Basics article.

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  • Pregnancy Precautions: FAQs

    Moms-to-be have a lot of questions about what’s safe during pregnancy. Keep your sanity by knowing what you can – and can’t – do before your baby arrives.

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  • Figuring Out Health News

    News reports on health and medicine can be confusing —and sometimes downright scary. How do you know what is important and accurate?

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  • When a Pet Dies

    For most kids, pets are more than just animals – they’re members of the family. So it can be heartbreaking to lose one. Here’s how to help kids cope.

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  • Helping Sam Hear: A Family’s Journey – Chapter One: The Diagnosis

    When 3-month-old Sam was diagnosed with profound hearing loss, his parents found hope when they learned that a cochlear implant might help Sam gain the ability to hear. Learn about their journey.

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  • How Much Food Should I Eat?

    Lots of us don’t realize we’re eating too much because we’ve become so used to large portions. This article for teens helps you take control of your plate.

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  • Alopecia: Kayla’s Story

    Kayla lost her hair, but that didn’t stop her from winning beauty pageants. Read how the winner of the Miss Delaware crown relied on confidence and leadership to stand above the crowd.

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  • About the Birth Control Pill

    Discussing issues like abstinence, STDs, and birth control can help lower teens’ risk of unintended pregnancy or getting an STD. The birth control pill (also called “the Pill”) is a daily pill that is taken to prevent pregnancy.

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  • About Withdrawal

    Talking to your kids about sex can be daunting. But discussing issues like abstinence, STDs, and birth control can help lower teens’ risk of unintended pregnancy or contracting an STD.

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  • Is My Son’s Voice Changing Too Soon?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

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  • What’s a Healthy Alternative to Water?

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  • Hemangiomas: Suzanne’s Story

    When Anna was born, she developed red spots that her parents learned were hemangiomas, benign birthmarks that she eventually outgrew. Her mother tells her story.

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  • Firesetting

    Kids often are curious about fire. So it’s important for parents to educate them about the dangers of fire and keep them away from matches, lighters, and other fire-starting tools.

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  • Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery)

    For teens who are severely obese, losing weight can be a challenge. When diet and exercise aren’t enough to help shed stubborn pounds, weight loss surgery may be an option.

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  • One Formula for a Healthy Lifestyle

    Learn about an easy way to remember the basics of a healthy lifestyle for your kids.

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  • Hydrocephalus

    Often called “water on the brain,” hydrocephalus can cause babies’ and young children’s heads to swell to make room for excess cerebrospinal fluid. Learn how this condition is managed.

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  • Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    Checking IgA levels can help doctors diagnose problems with the immune system, intestines, and kidneys. It’s also used to evaluate autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and celiac disease.

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  • Telling Parents You’re Pregnant

    If you just learned you’re pregnant, you’re not alone. You probably wonder how to tell your parents and how they’ll react. Read our article for some tips.

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  • Stem Cell Transplants

    Stem cells can develop into cells with different skills, so they’re useful in treating diseases like cancer.

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  • Germ Cell Tumors

    Germ cell tumors, which can be cancerous or noncancerous, occur when cells in a developing fetus develop abnormally.

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  • Liver Tumors

    Treatment for these abnormal growths (which can be cancerous or noncancerous) may involve surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation.

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  • Safety Tips: Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is undeniably cool, but it’s also easy to get hurt. Keep it safe while skateboarding with these safety tips.

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  • Safety Tips: Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is undeniably cool, but it’s also easy for riders to get hurt. Help your kids keep it safe with these safety tips.

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  • Raising a Child With Autism: Paige and Iain’s Story

    When their son was diagnosed with autism at age 3, Paige and Iain were devastated. Since then, Lochlan has gotten the treatment and services he needs, and is learning about the world around him. Read their story.

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  • What Should I Do If I Can’t Sleep?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

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  • Asking for Help: Getting Past Obstacles

    Sometimes our ideas and beliefs stand in the way of asking for help. Here are ideas for teens on how to get past 5 common barriers to getting help.

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  • Blood Types

    Blood might look the same and do the same job, but tiny cell markers mean one person’s body can reject another person’s blood. Find out how blood types work in this article for teens.

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  • Health Care: What Do You Know?

    How much do you know about taking charge of your health care? Take our quiz and find out!

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  • Jellyfish Stings

    Frolicking in the ocean is a summertime rite of passage, but a jellyfish sting can spoil the fun. Here’s how to handle it if someone in your family gets zapped by one of these mysterious sea creatures.

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  • A to Z: Mononucleosis

    Learn more about mononucleosis, an infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with flu-like symptoms.

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  • A to Z: Alopecia Areata

    Alopecia areata is a condition that causes hair loss on the scalp and sometimes elsewhere on the body.

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  • How to Choose & Use Sunscreen

    With all the options out there, choosing a sunscreen for your kids can be tricky. Here’s what you need to know.

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  • Mononucleosis Special Needs Factsheet

    What teachers should know about mono, how to help infected students, and how to protect uninfected students.

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  • Classroom Exercise Breaks for Elementary Students

    Elementary school teachers can incorporate physical activity breaks into daily classroom routines to help improve test scores and student behavior. This article is for educators.

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  • Survey Results: How Well Do Kids Get Along With Parents?

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  • Bath Salts

    Bath salts are powerful stimulant drugs that increase brain and central nervous system activity. Find out how they can affect you in this article for teens.

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  • Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    There are several different types of weight loss surgeries. One type is gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy. Find out what’s involved and who gets it in this article for teens.

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  • Cerebral Palsy: Shannon’s Story (Video)

    Shannon has cerebral palsy, which limits many abilities. But her wheelchair and her communication device give her the freedom to explore, and a voice to be heard.

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  • A to Z: Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Kids and teens with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have multiple seizures that usually start around puberty and continue into adulthood unless the seizures are controlled by medicine.

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  • Survey Results: How Do Parents and Kids Get Along?

    Most kids and parents say they get along pretty well, but it’s tougher to stay close through the years, according to a survey of parents and kids.

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